© Goulburn Valley Hearing Clinic Pty Ltd 2016
Goulburn Valley Hearing Clinic

What Happens At A Hearing Test?

Having a hearing test is easy and painless and will provide you with information about how well you are hearing. To find out just how well you can hear a range of sounds, the audiologist will play you a series of beeps and whistles (pure tones) through headphones. Your job is to indicate when you have heard a sound by pressing a button.  We are looking to find the softest sounds you can hear for a number of different tones ranging from low (bass) to high (treble). The results are plotted on a graph called an audiogram. The audiologist also wants to know how well you hear and understand speech.  Lists of words are played at different volume levels to each ear in turn. You repeat the words as you hear them, guessing if you're not sure. Your audiologist may also need to find out how well your middle ears are working. To do this, a soft rubber tip is put in the ear and air is gently pumped in and out of the ear canal while a humming noise is played. This test shows if your eardrum is working properly and whether there is any congestion or damage in the middle ear. After all the tests have been completed your audiologist will discuss the results with you and – if you have a hearing loss - the various options you have, which may include hearing aids or assistive listening devices. You may be referred back to your doctor for medical management if appropriate.

What Happens

At A Hearing

Test?

Having a hearing test is easy and painless and will provide you with information about how well you are hearing. To find out just how well you can hear a range of sounds, the audiologist will play you a series of beeps and whistles (pure tones) through headphones. Your job is to indicate when you have heard a sound by pressing a button.  We are looking to find the softest sounds you can hear for a number of different tones ranging from low (bass) to high (treble). The results are plotted on a graph called an audiogram. The audiologist also wants to know how well you hear and understand speech.  Lists of words are played at different volume levels to each ear in turn. You repeat the words as you hear them, guessing if you're not sure. Your audiologist may also need to find out how well your middle ears are working. To do this, a soft rubber tip is put in the ear and air is gently pumped in and out of the ear canal while a humming noise is played. This test shows if your eardrum is working properly and whether there is any congestion or damage in the middle ear. After all the tests have been completed your audiologist will discuss the results with you and – if you have a hearing loss - the various options you have, which may include hearing aids or assistive listening devices. You may be referred back to your doctor for medical management if appropriate.
© Goulburn Valley Hearing Clinic Pty Ltd 2016
GV Hearing Clinic